How to write an abstract for a dissertation proposal

Most authors agree that it is harder to write a short description of something than a long one. Here's a tip: for your first draft, don't be overly concerned about the length. Just make sure you include all the key information. Then take your draft and start crossing out words, phrases, and sentences that are less important than others. Look for places where you can combine sentences in ways that shorten the total length. Put it aside for a while, then come back and re-read your draft. With a fresh eye, you'll probably find new places to cut. Before you know it you will have a tightly written abstract.

2.) Write a draft that follows the guidelines from number 1, above. Get feedback on the draft from colleagues, supervisors, teachers, etc.--someone who has not read the longer work. See what questions they have and ask them to explain to you what they expect from the longer work. This will help you to see if the abstract is doing its job. Use the English grammar checker while writing the draft and the writing enhancement feature that serves as a vocabulary check.
3.) Revise the abstract based on the feedback. Plan to revise often to get it right and to keep it within the word limit. Be sure to use the WhiteSmoke spell check and grammar check while revising. Also, this is a good time to use the powerful thesaurus to suggest more effective language and the large dictionary to make sure that you are using each word correctly.
4.) Be sure your abstract is grammatically correct with correct spelling and punctuation by using WhiteSmoke English grammar check and spell check one more time!


Quick Navigation Menu ------------ Search our Website Website Contents Writing Center Locations Writing Center Hours About the Writing Center Contact the Writing Center International Student Info Information for Instructors ------------- Individual Instruction Writing Center Classes Writing Fellows Program Writing Across the Curriculum Internet Writing Resources These materials were made possible thanks to the generous support from the Kemper K. Knapp Bequest Committee. On this page, the UW-Madison Writing Center Writer's Handbook offers advice on writing abstracts and answers questions such as: including:

I often write or revise abstracts last. The ideal time for me is after working through the entire article or proposal. Not immediately after, when I'm tired and may be tempted to dash off something quick; but just long enough for it all to percolate and brew up a clear vision of what I've accomplished. If such vision appears, I just do my best-or possibly decide the article really lacks coherence and needs yet another thorough overhaul! If the vision does appear, I try to capture a good snapshot for the harried potential reader, hoping at least one of us will benefit.

How to write an abstract for a dissertation proposal

how to write an abstract for a dissertation proposal

I often write or revise abstracts last. The ideal time for me is after working through the entire article or proposal. Not immediately after, when I'm tired and may be tempted to dash off something quick; but just long enough for it all to percolate and brew up a clear vision of what I've accomplished. If such vision appears, I just do my best-or possibly decide the article really lacks coherence and needs yet another thorough overhaul! If the vision does appear, I try to capture a good snapshot for the harried potential reader, hoping at least one of us will benefit.

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